Postgraduate Studies

Postgraduate research programs at CRCC are usually undertaken at the level of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) or Master of Science (MSc). If you are interested in conducting postgraduate research at CCRC, visit the research topics section of this site to find more out about research topics. Potential supervisors may be sought from the CCRC Team. For a list of current  PhD students and their projects please browse the CCRC postgraduate student list. Please check out details of the CCRC PhD program here. For further information please contact the Postgraduate Research Coordinator.

PhD Doctor of Philosophy

The PhD degree provides training in research up to the level necessary for initiating and carrying out unsupervised original research. Like a MSc degree, the PhD requires the candidate to carry our research on an approved topic, under the supervision of a member of staff. The PhD degree, however, is of a far higher standard than the MSc and demands a much greater capacity for independent and original research. On completion of the research the results are incorporated into a thesis, which is submitted for examination by experts in the field. The PhD usually requires at least three years of full-time study. Part-time PhD candidature is encouraged but only for candidates who can spend at least 20 hours per week on their research and are able to maintain regular contact with the university. For more information on our PhD program, click here.

PhD within the ARC Centre of Excellence

A major benefit of undertaking postgraduate research in the CCRC is the opportunity to work with researchers in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science. The Centre of Excellence comprises five universities, CSIRO, the Bureau of Meteorology and some of the world's most outstanding international research organisations. Most students are co-supervised across these institutions. There are also opportunities to undertake a joint PhD across two of the Centre of Excellence universities. For more information on the Centre of Excellence, click here.

Master of Science by Research

The MSc degree provides basic training in research. Each candidate is given an individual research topic and carries out research on the topic under the personal supervision of a member of staff within the CCRC. Like a PhD, upon completion of the research, the results are incorporated into a thesis, which is submitted for examination by experts in the field.

Postgraduate Coursework

The School of Mathematics and Statistics runs several postgraduate level coursework degrees, such as Master of Science and Technology in Mathematics or Graduate Diploma in Oceanography. For more information on these courses go to Coursework.

Career opportunities

There’s a wide variety of careers available to MSc and PhD graduates in climate science and a high global demand for graduate-qualified researchers in climate, oceanography, atmospheric physics and computational modelling. Appointments secured by past CCRC graduates include:

  • Post doctoral research appointments in Australian and overseas  universities
  • Environmental consulting
  • Research appointment in an overseas national observatory
  • Post doctoral appointment at CSIRO

To date, 100% of CCRC PhD graduates have secured full time employment shortly after graduating, if not before.

Scholarships

The University of New South Wales offers a variety of scholarships for undergraduate, postgraduate, local and international students. Scholarships are competitive and awarded on the basis of academic merit.

In Australia, scholarships to cover living expenses and tuition must be sought independently of the application to graduate school.  The main funding source is the government APA scheme for Australian and New Zealand nationals, and EIPRS scheme for other foreign nationals. These schemes, especially the EIPRS, are competitive and require high marks in the last few years of tertiary education, and/or previous research experience.  There are other funding opportunities including scholarships available directly through CCRC staff members, through the newly established ARC Centre of Excellence in Climate Sciences, or through external funding bodies. If you have any further questions please contact the Postgraduate Research Coordinator.

Local and international students click here for information on postgraduate scholarships and potential CCRC supervisors. For other scholarship opportunities go to UNSW Graduate Research School Scholarships page or the UNSW Scholarships web site.

Scholarships available for domestic students

Note: Domestic students include Australian and New Zealand citizens and Australian permanent residents.

Australian Postgraduate Award (APA)

Closing Dates:

  • Applications for students commencing in semester 1 usually close October in the preceding year.
  • Applications for students commencing in semester 2 usually close in May.

Students generally need to have a first class honours degree, or equivalent to be competitive for APAs. The scholarship covers a living stipend, relocation allowance for relocation from within Australia or New Zealand and a thesis allowance for costs associated with producing your thesis.
For details of APA admissions and scholarship application procedures, click here.
For further information about the Australian Postgraduate Award, click here.

Scholarships available for international students

Note: There may be additional scholarships available through your home country.

International Postgraduate Research Scholarship (IPRS)

Closing Dates:

  • Applications for students commencing in semester 1 usually close August in the preceding year.
  • Applications for students commencing in semester 2 usually close in February

IPRS are open to all international applicants (except New Zealand citizens) and cover tuition fees and provide a living expenses stipend.  IPRS are very difficult to get; you will need to have a first class honours degree, and/or a Research Masters with the equivalent of a first class to be competitive.  Prizes, research experience and publications are also taken into account.

For details of IPRS admissions and scholarship application procedures, click here.
For further information about the International Postgraduate Research Scholarship, click here.

Endeavour Postgraduate Award

Closing Date:

  • June 30th

Endeavour Postgraduate Awards are merit-based scholarships available to students in the Asia Pacific, the Middle East, Europe and the Americas. The scholarships cover tuition fees, a living stipend, travel allowance and establishment costs. Applicants must apply for and be admitted to a postgraduate program before applying for the scholarship. Applications are made directly through the Endeavour Awards website.

To be eligible for an Endeavour Postgraduate Award you must be a citizen or permanent resident of a participating country. You may not be an Australian citizen or permanent resident, or a New Zealand citizen.

For further information about the Endeavour Postgraduate Award, including eligible countries and details of the application process, click here.

AusAID Development Scholarships

Closing Date:

  • Differs depending on country of residence.

AusAID development scholarships provide opportunities for students from developing countries to undertake full-time study at Australian universities. The scholarships cover tuition fees, a living stipend, travel allowance and establishment costs. Application processes and closing dates differ depending on your country of citizenship/residency. Each participating country has a list of priority areas for awarding scholarships. It is worth noting that many countries list climate change as one of their priorities.

For further information about the AusAID Development Scholarship, including participating countries and details of the application process, click here.

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