CCRC Team: Postgraduate students

Esteban Abellan Esteban Abellan

Esteban started his PhD in September 2013 at the Climate Change Research Centre at the UNSW. His project focuses on the termination of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events. In particular, the main aim of his PhD project is to identify the role of the southward wind shift in the seasonal phase locking of ENSO and whether this southward shift can account for the fact that La Niña events tend to persist for longer periods than El Niño events. He will be using simplified coupled models and data from the state-of-the-art CMIP5 climate models.

Email: e.abellanvillardon@student.unsw.edu.au

Witek Bagniewski Witek Bagniewski

Witek is using the UVic Earth System Climate Model to study the last glacial period. He estimates how a climate change signal propagates under different modes of ocean circulation and aims to improve the use of paleoproxy records in timing abrupt climate change and in ice volume reconstructions.

Email: w.bagniewski@student.unsw.edu.au

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Alice Barthel Alice Barthel

Alice started her PhD at UNSW in 2013. Her research focuses on eddy mixing processes in the Southern Ocean. In particular, her project will investigate how jet-topography interactions affect eddy mixing‬ through the combined use of observations and idealised models. Before joining UNSW, Alice completed a MSc Oceanography in Southampton (UK) where she studied the Agulhas Undercurrent from NEMO outputs. She also did short-term research work in Grenoble (France) looking at intrinsic variability of the ocean at interannual timescales, with focus on the Gulf Stream region.‬‬

Email: a.barthel@student.unsw.edu.au

Christopher Bull Christopher Bull

Chris is interested in the flow of water in the oceans north and south of Australia: the Indonesian Throughflow and the Tasman leakage. Chris' research focuses on the interrelationship of these two ocean currents using Lagrangian techniques. Chris is also interested in investigating the Tasman leakage's year to year variability in terms of modes of variability, e.g. ENSO and the Indian Ocean Dipole.

Email: christopher.y.bull@student.unsw.edu.au

Click here for personal web page.

Cameron Cairns Cameron Cairns
Cameron is interested in large scale atmospheric dynamics. His research project is focused on the unforced, interannual variability of the subtropical jet and eddy-driven jet and the interaction between the two.

Wasin Chaivarnont Wasin Chaivarnont

Wasin started his PhD at UNSW in March 2014. He is currently focusing on the topic of estimating wildfire fuel load from remotely sensed data. In particular, he aims to enhance the accuracy of the current estimated fuel load spatial distribution by utilising the new microwave based vegetation indices recently available, in combination with other visible and near infrared remote sensing.

Email: w.chaivaranont@student.unsw.edu.au

Hamish Clarke
Thesis title: Projecting fire weather using regional climate model

Hamish is interested in the ability of regional climate models to capture bushfire weather.

Email: h.clarke@student.unsw.edu.au  

Tim Cowan

Tim is currently studying the large-scale impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on atmospheric-oceanic circulation. He is also interested in understanding how both anthropogenic and volcanic aerosols modulate oceanic heat content, and impact the Asia monsoon.

Email: tim.cowan@csiro.au

Ned Haughton Ned Haughton

Ned's research investigates the behaviour and representation of land surface processes in models. The project involves analysis of code and simulations from a number of popular land surface models. The aim is track down causes of patterns of weak performance, and, if possible, to provide solutions to those problems.

Email: ned@nedhaughton.com

Annette Hirsch Annette Hirsch

Annette is investigating the feedback relationship between terrestrial processes (e.g. soil moisture, land cover change) and precipitation and how this is represented in the hydrological cycle. The aim is to improve the coupling between the land surface and atmosphere in existing models to contribute to more realistic representations of the present global climate and increase our understanding of how this will evolve with climate change.

Email: a.hirsch@student.unsw.edu.au

Click here for personal web page.

Willem Huiskamp Willem Huiskamp

The last 3000 years in the northern hemisphere encompasses a range of climate extremes, including relative warmth (including the latter part of the twentieth century and the so-called ‘Medieval Warm Period’) and cooling (the ‘Little Ice Age’). The climate mechanisms of these changes remains unresolved. Using the University of Victoria (UVic) Earth System Climate Model, this project will investigate different mechanisms of past climate change by exploring the impact of changing atmospheric circulation (with a particular focus on the southern hemisphere) on global climate and ocean circulation. To test the outputs, 14C and palaeoclimate reconstruction comparisons will be made regionally and globally.

Email: w.huiskamp@unsw.edu.au

David Hutchinson David Hutchinson

David is interested in coupled ocean-atmosphere modelling, focusing on
oceanic modes of variability in the Australian region. He plans to use
fluid dynamic theory to further develop our understanding of these modes
of variability.

Email: david.hutchinson@student.unsw.edu.au

Click here for more information and contact details for David Hutchinson.

Andrew King Andrew King
Thesis Title: Investigating the drivers of extreme rainfall variability in Australia

Andrew is investigating the teleconnections between climate drivers and extreme precipitation. As part of his PhD he will analyse observed statistical relationships between the drivers and extreme rainfall before examining the physical mechanisms behind these relationships. He will then use a climate model to see if it can capture these relationships and study model projections of extreme rainfall over Australia.

Email: andrew.king@student.unsw.edu.au.

Click here for personal web page.

Karin Kvale
Thesis title: Modelling the role of biological calcification in the ocean carbon cycle

Karin is interested in representations of ocean biology in coupled global biogeochemical climate models, and how they relate to the ocean carbon dioxide sink. She is currently implementing calcifiers in the UVic ESCM and exploring the sensitivity of equilibrium states to model parameterisation. Additional research interests include biogeochemical shifts in deep time, and coupled economic and climate modelling.

Email: k.kvale@student.unsw.edu.au  

Yue Li Yue Li

Yue investigates ocean-atmosphere interactions and their role for monsoon variability.  In particular, she is interested in the mechanisms controlling the Asian-Australian monsoon system, the Tropospheric Biennial Oscillation (TBO), and their relationship with the Indian and Pacific SST variability.

Email: yue.li@student.unsw.edu.au

Click here for personal web page.

Nicola Maher Nicola Maher

Nicola is interested in the subduction of heat into the ocean. Her research will focus on how the ocean heat content is affected by the additional input of energy into the Earth’s system due to climate change.

Email: n.maher@student.unsw.edu.au

Penelope Maher Penelope Maher

Penelope is interested in cloud physics and is investigating how changes in the treatment of convection in GCMs improve simulations of atmospheric
variability including rainfall over Australia.

Email: penelope.maher@student.unsw.edu.au

Click here for personal web page.

Nidhi Nidhi Nidhi Nidhi

Nidhi started her PhD at CCRC in March 2014. She is interested in understanding the effects of aerosols on cloud invigoration. Her research will focus primarily on investigating the impacts of aerosols on different cloud types using cloud resolving models.

Prior to her PhD, she did a short term research work at CCRC where she analysed the long term temperature trends from the global radiosonde data. She did her masters from IIT Delhi (India) where she studied cloud climatologies through active and passive satellite data.

Email: n.nidhi@unsw.edu.au

Marissa Parry

Marissa is interested in the environmental justice movement. For her honours project, her research focuses on performing a qualitative and quantitative analysis to identify situations of environmental injustices in Australia.

Email: marissa.parry@unsw.edu.au

Acacia Pepler
Acacia is interested in rainfall patterns on the east coast, and how they differ from the rest of Australia. In particular, she's interested in local rainfall influences such as East Coast Lows and easterly windflow, and how they interact with the major climate drivers. By understanding this, she hopes to improve our ability to understand and predict changes in east coast rainfall, both on the seasonal timescale and longer term changes.

Claire O'Neill Xuerong (Shirley) Qin

Shirley is interested in modeling biophysical interactions in the oceans. Her PhD will focus on understanding the distribution of nutrients using Lagrangian techniques.

Email: xuerong.qin@student.unsw.edu.au

Click here for personal web page.

Jess Roe Jess Roe
Thesis title: Extending our knowledge of Southern Hemisphere tropical environment and climate dynamics over the last 3000 years.

Focusing on the Atherton Tablelands, Jess will investigate lacustrine sediment cores using multi-proxy analysis and comprehensive dating to determine the extent of environment and climate change in tropical Australia during the last 3000 years. The findings will be compared to regional and global palaeorecords.

Email: jessica.roe@unsw.edu.au

Litty Thomas Litty Thomas

Litty is interested to work on the land surface processes which are central to connect the physical, chemical and biological components of the climate system. Also, land-atmosphere interaction plays a significant role in accelerating climate change through extreme climatic events. Hence, this PhD project will particularly focus on how different land surface processes affect resilience through modeling studies.

Email: litty.thomas@student.unsw.edu.au

Bevan Warren Bevan Warren

Bevan is interested in the social dimensions of climate change. His research investigates the alternative energy futures for the Latrobe Valley region and how a transition to a more sustainable future could occur.

Email: b.warren@student.unsw.edu.au

 

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