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CCRC researchers receive grants from 2013 Australian funding round

Researchers from the Climate Change Research Centre have received five grants and awards in the most recent round of Australian research council's National Competitive Grants Program.

Two of these grants were Discovery Early Career Researcher Awards (DECRAs). DECRAs are awarded to up and coming researchers who have completed PhDs within the past five years. Dr Erik van Sebille and Dr Shayne McGregor will use the money from their DECRAs to kickstart their researcher career, as it gives them three year support to set up their own research line.

“The DECRA is basically a tremendous Career boost,” said Dr McGregor

“It will provide me with the research freedom to continue building my research profile, while the associated recognition and exposure will likely enhance future collaborative research opportunities."

In addition to these two DECRAs, Prof Chris Turney and Dr Katrin Meissner were successful in their application for a Discovery Grant, Dr Jason Evens received a Discovery Indigenous grant, and Prof Steven Sherwood was part of a team that received a grant under the Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities program.

We congratulate all the awardees and wish them success in the coming years.

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